EPA continues to scale back Obama era regulations and protections

In this article (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/15/climate/epa-paint-stripper-methylene-chloride.html), Lisa Friedman reports on the recent scaling back of a lethal chemical found in paint stripping products. The current E.P.A. administrator, Andrew Wheeler, appointed by President Trump, prohibited the use of the chemical in consumer products, but did not ban it for commercial use. The article’s lede is successful but the […]

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Are we there yet? A new report on fuel economy standards causes clash in the automotive world

In his article (https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-mpg-fuel-economy-20190306-story.html), Ryan Beene provides a glimpse inside the ongoing debate over fuel economy standards in the U.S. automotive industry. In light of a recent report released by the EPA, Beene uses ample statistics and quotes from both the Trump administration and environmentalists to explore how clean car standards have changed and are […]

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Do we believe dark chocolate is healthy? – A look into scientific journalism.

Ricardo Bilton takes a look into scientific reporting and makes us question whether the factual science related topics we want to believe are fraud. In his story, a new organization is attempting to aid in the validity and quality of facts reported in the field of science. Bilton presents this new nonprofit that is reaching […]

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YouTube takes another step in regulating consumption visual media

https://mashable.com/article/youtube-fact-check-feature/#NA9uBSQl3ZqO Matt Binder gives a brief, yet powerful summary of YouTube’s new fact-checking feature that began to roll-out this week. His lede is very short, but it is really intriguing. Binder’s decision to describe the new feature as YouTube “dealing another blow” gives the reader a sense of the potential impact of this feature without […]

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The Power of Visual Storytelling – YouTube on the Rise

Jack Nicas provides us with a brief but in-depth insight into the increasing popularity that YouTube is having – in terms of daily viewer count as well as daily video upload amount. As he delves into the numbers and statistics, Nicas reflects on the larger trend at hand of online video that is taking over […]

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Knight Forum: Future of News – Live @ 9 am 2/26

Here’s a news release from Detroit Public TV that should be of interest to anyone interested in the future of news: The Knight Media Forum will be convening leading experts at both the local and national level to explore solutions to assure that all citizens receive accurate, reliable news and information that serves the needs of their diverse […]

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Daily Skimm Class Edition: Paper or Plastic?

“Quote of the day” “Pretty soon they’re going to be taxing the air you breathe” – Jim Pruim, Truck Driver New Illinois Tax Law Has it in The Bag The Story Robert Channick, Chicago Tribune writer, reports in his article, https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-biz-illinois-bag-tax-20190221-story.html, on a proposal created by newly elected Illinois State Governor, J.B. Pritzker, that would implement a new 5-cent disposable bag tax […]

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Is the E.P.A. Regulating Chemicals or Distributing Them?

The Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/21/us/trump-epa-chemicals-regulations.html Side Effects May Include:The lede and nut graph of this piece seem to be combined. Basically, the author explains that the EPA has been attempting to prohibit the spread of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) into drinking water. It can come from old carpets or non-stick pans that used the chemical before people knew […]

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Mistrust and Sensationalism in Scientific News

In Dana Smith’s article, she poses the question of whether scientists should be able to review articles they’re quoted in before publication. It aptly voices the opinions scientists and journalist, with acute justifications from each side. Her lede uses the “shades of grey” cliché to introduce the complexity of the issue. A statistic from a […]

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See Ya Data, Facebook in Decline

As internet users find their place amongst the many social media platforms now available to them, Facebook is losing favor. Internationally, Facebook has seen a decline in its users most drastically in Europe where they have a larger user base than the United States. One potential reason for this is the new continent-wide privacy law, […]

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How much responsibility does Google hold to protect us?

In this story on a malicious app found in the Google Play store, Dan Godin succinctly describes an app that was recently discovered to fake being a well-known cryptocurrency-managing app but instead redirects users to the developers online wallet. The title is catchy because it combines “Google” and “caught.” At least for me, this caught my attention […]

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The Complexity of Google Maps

Alexis C. Madrigal takes a deeper look past Google’s search functions and instead explores the functioning of Google Maps in her article “How Google Builds Its Maps—and What It Means for the Future of Everything” (https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/09/how-google-builds-its-maps-and-what-it-means-for-the-future-of-everything/261913/). I found Madrigal’s piece to be very interesting, as I hadn’t realized the amount of complex programming and intricate […]

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Not Just Another Pipeline Permitting Story

In “Quoting ‘The Lorax,’ Court Pulls Permit For Pipeline Crossing Appalachian Trail,” NPR reporter Laurel Wamsley identifies and leverages two tidbits of information sure to hook the reader. With strong organization, a clean lead, and effective quotes, the story is a success. Just as Cappon recommends in “The AP Guide to News Writing,” Wamsley has […]

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