Three Sides to Every Story

This week’s module includes an intriguing example of one story viewed from three discrete angles. Ryan Standon’s MLive article uses voices of EPA employees, lawmakers, and community members to highlight this EPA lab’s importance in conducting environmental testing and providing jobs. It shows how this proposed cut would hurt the facility, although there is a […]

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Where are the Quotes?

I am supposed to be the Student’s Choice blog leader, so here is my subsequent blog post. The New York Times story,”What’s at Stake in Trump’s Proposed E.P.A. Cuts,” written by Hiroko Tabuchi tells about the different sectors that would be affected by proposed EPA budget cuts. In the beginning of the article, Tabuchi starts with […]

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EPA Story Too Biased?

The E&E News story, “The lonely fight to save an EPA lab from Trump’s climate cuts,” written by Camille von Kaenel, tells a story about the EPA’s National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory in Ann Arbor. In the beginning of the article, Kaenel paints a picture of what the EPA lab does with descriptive and […]

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Week 7: Julia & Emilia’s Choice

In this weeks reading, vastly different journalistic techniques are employed to tell similar, or sometime the same, stories. On the InsideClimate News story, the writer set up an entire narrative that evolved throughout the story. It started with named people; their community, the specifics of that significant morning, their jobs, and their families. Using this […]

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Week 7: student’s choice

For this week I read coverage of Line 5, the 65-year-old oil pipeline running under the Great Lakes which has generated controversy for its precarious state and the operating company’s resistance to shutting the pipeline down or maintaining it properly, despite its initial lifetime estimate of 50 years. The story I read was the MLive […]

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Refugee Photos – Visual Storytelling (Week Six, Student’s Choice)

I chose two articles to feature. The first article is  “Photographing Climate Change Refugees, by Drone and on Foot,” by James Estrin. The second article is “Documenting the Rohingya Refugee Crisis – in Pictures” by Kevin Frayer. Both photo journals share a similar topic: refugees; yet both photographers utilize very different styles to depict certain messages. Estrin’s collection […]

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YouTube Article Packs a Punch

In the Wall Street Journal article “YouTube Tops 1 Billion Hours of Video a Day, on Pace to Eclipse TV” written by Jack Nicas, he presents an overview of YouTube’s growth and strategies. When beginning the article, I feel that Nicas gets straight to the point of what the article will discuss, beginning with the […]

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Reply to Week 5 (Alice’s post)

“All the Ways Trump’s Budget Cuts Science Funding” by Sarah Zhang and “Trump plan for 40% cut could cause EPA science office ‘to implode,’ official warns” by Warren Cornwall, are articles that cover the same topic but vary vastly in style. Even from the title, it is easy to see what kind of direction the […]

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Climb of ADHD prescriptions

Benedict Carey writes an article addressing the issue of higher rates of ADHD medication being prescribed to young adults, more specifically females. The article is clearly informative, but may be lacking some of the components that make a strong article. The lede is a statistic that is shocking to the reader and is a quick […]

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2 years after TIME cover story, how does Flint family feel about the publicity?

In 2016, Regina Boone’s photo of a sick boy in Flint made the cover of TIME magazine, becoming a symbol of the city’s problems. The story that Boone and Elisha told in the Detroit Free Press was difficult to forget. Two years later, what’s happened to the lead-exposed boy, Sincere Smith? How does his family […]

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Week 5: Student’s Choice

The two articles I selected showcase different ways that a journalist can approach a scientific piece: To start, read this piece by Benedict Carey.  Carey begins with a statistic in the first sentence and I felt like a lede was missing.  In the 4th & 5th paragraph, Carey continues to cite specific statistics that I felt myself […]

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Week 5 – Emilia & Julie’s Choice

Two of this week’s articles discuss Trump’s cuts to science funding. These pieces employ very different journalistic techniques. “All the Ways Trump’s Budget Cuts Science Funding” , written by Sarah Zhang, is concise and packed with statistics. I found the article easy to read because it’s so straightforward, but I think it lacks in quotes. In […]

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News Critique “People of Flint Speak: ‘Nobody should… be living like this”

In “People of Flint speak: ‘Nobody should … be living like this’” Elisa Anderson, Detroit Free Press author, writes an effective essay on the flint water crises. Anderson captures the readers attention with emotional stories about the victims. As the reader learns about the individual stories of people affected, the crisis becomes personified. As a […]

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