First Impressions Last a Lifetime

And this article had a terrible first impression. The title left me baffled. Toyota tackled a chicken and an egg? The entire company? What a poor chicken. Clearly, the egg would not survive either. The author used her metaphor before it was even introduced. Also, I understand the problem of the chicken versus the egg; including […]

Continue reading

Small Farm Fight Back: Food and Community Self-Governance

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/beverly-bell/small-farms-fight-back_b_3085956.html This article was written by Beverly Bell for the Huffington Post “Harvesting Justice” series, which documents changes in the food and sustainability movement. This particular article examines the ways in which communities and small community farm owners have taken action to save the movement from increasingly restrictive federal legislation. I think that overall Bell […]

Continue reading

Modernization and Conservation: Farming Pollution Risks in Context

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/28/us/2500-pigs-join-debate-over-farms-vs-scenery.html In the New York Times article by John Eligon on the environmental and community implications of a pig farm being established on a pristine river in Arkansas, the article seeks to explore how the decision to allow for a farm is adjudicated through state, federal and local governance. The essential question the article asks […]

Continue reading

Genetically Modified Food

By: Kayla-Cymone Nwokeji http://grist.org/food/the-genetically-modified-food-debate-where-do-we-begin/ Nathaniel Johnson writes on the topic on how to find the truths about genetically modified food. Throughout his first article, he speaks about how it is so hard to find reliable information and hard facts on this topic. Many people who either agree or disagree seem to have reliable facts and […]

Continue reading

Story Structure, Responsibility, and Sexual Assault

Rolling Stone’s original report on Jackie’s rape case at The University of Virginia was highly disturbing as well as it was impacting. I think that the most important tool it used in keeping reader engagement while also delivering important facts was that it found a powerful representative story that spanned for years and used it […]

Continue reading

Difficulties of Seeking Out the Truth in Reporting on Sensitive Issues

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/08/business/media/rolling-stone-tries-to-regroup-after-campus-rape-article-is-disputed.html?_r=0 This article, regarding the aftermath of Rolling Stone’s false UVA rape story, poses some complicated questions in terms of reporting sensitive stories such as rape. When reporting about a traumatic experience the interviewee had, accounts may often get skewed, because sometimes the mind works in a way that will shut out any unwanted memories. There is […]

Continue reading

Sorority Anti-Rape Idea: Drinking on Own Turf

This was an interesting NY Times piece in such that it examined one of the possible solutions to answering the larger question of what is to be done about rape culture on college campuses: having parties in sororities rather than just fraternities. Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/20/us/sorority-anti-rape-idea-drinking-on-own-turf.html The story is generally balanced and informative and has a very strong […]

Continue reading

Working Around Partisan Divides: the Clean Air Act of 1970

The New York Times article Obama Builds Environmental Legacy with 1970 Law, elaborates on how the Clean Air Act is being used to create and enforce EPA regulations. Because of heavy opposition from the Republican party, the Obama administration was forced to rely on the Clean Air Act in order to regulate carbon emissions. The […]

Continue reading

Creative Ways of Presenting Climate Change -

http://www.pri.org/stories/2014-07-09/classical-music-album-about-climate-challenges-surprise-atop-charts Christopher Tin, composer of the classical album ‘The Drop That Contained The Sea,’ presents the ever-growing concern of climate change through an original medium – music. Tin composes pieces intended to represent and reflect nature and all it has to offer. His pieces feature classical sounds that resemble things ranging from the frightening crash […]

Continue reading

Ancient findings support climate change predictions

Cool article about new findings! http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31131336 New findings about ancient times suggest that the recent predictions made by the IPCC about climate change in relation to rising carbon emissions are correct. Scientists from the UK and Australia have used climate records and ancient carbon samples trapped in ice to construct a model of how climate responded […]

Continue reading

Questions for Friday: Science and Journalism

1. What are some mistakes a journalist can make when covering a scientific story? What are the consequences for that field of science, the scientists interviewed, and for the journalist? 2. Two of the readings listed questions a journalist might ask a scientist to get an interesting and accurate story. Some of these were, “What […]

Continue reading

Scientist and Journalist: are they speaking the same language?

The first time anything about climate change or global warming was noted was in 1896 when Arrhenius published the first calculation of global warming from human emissions of CO2. It wasn’t until the 1960’s that the scientific community really started to show more evidence that global warming and climate change could actually impact our earth. […]

Continue reading

Documenting Sustainable Farming in Kenya (Visual Story Telling)

Here is my piece to contribute to our visual story telling segment. I made this film through an internship with Actuality Media, a media organization committed to social change. They have interns make short documentaries that can serve as promotionals for regional NGO’s. Permanent Culture documents the journey of Joseph, a man who once worked […]

Continue reading
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 82 other followers