The death of privacy

As most people probably know, there is no such thing as privacy anymore now that we have reached the digital age.  We post things about our lives on social media and do so many things online.  We are constantly connected through our phones and computers and we constantly give companies the right to our personal information every time you download something and click accept.  Google looks at what you search for and where you go in order to provide you with what you are looking for and provide ad companies with what your interests are.

In the article (link below) in the words of Max Mosley, “The need for a private life is something that is completely subjective.  You either would mind somebody publishing a film of you doing your ablutions in the morning or you wouldn’t. Personally I would and I think most people would.”

I find all of this to be very troubling, but I’m not going to stop using my phone or using google.  I feel as though overtime this will just become the new normal and no one will even realize that anything is wrong, however, that power over people seems like it could potentially be dangerous.  Personally, I feel as though the article was really long and it was unnecessary to have so many examples to prove the point.  However, I do feel as though these examples are what makes the article stand out and add something further, showing instead of telling.

Why do you think that people do not actively protest in order to gain back their privacy?  Do you think that as technology furthers there will be even less privacy and companies will know everything about you with great accuracy?  Does that worry you?

How do you feel about the effectiveness of this article in getting the information out there? Do you think that the article is too long? Do you feel as though the various examples of people’s lives adds something to the article?  Do you think that the author uses good descriptive language or that a number of the big words just makes the article confusing to understand?

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/aug/03/internet-death-privacy-google-facebook-alex-preston

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4 Responses to “The death of privacy”

  1. I think this article raises a number of extremely interesting points in regards to how we think about our privacy in a continuously changing Internet based environment. The author’s emphasis of current events that have brought privacy issues to the forefront is a compelling way to attribute saliency to the topic of privacy. Highlighting the idea of manipulation of consumers also seems to be a compelling way to draw readers into continuing to read the article. Another idea that I think the author does well to address is the idea that collectively people tend to make life events, whereabouts, and thoughts more public through avenues of social media, something that I feel is particularly key in how we talk about online privacy.

    With this being said, I think there are a number of concerns that I have with the article. First, for me personally, the article is entirely too long. For me personally, the structure and later content of the article made it difficult for me to keep reading until the end. The reading seems to get somewhat dense toward the later parts of the article. Additionally, the article appears to read more like an op-ed piece than a more traditional news article. The author clearly has an opinion about the privacy issue that is clear throughout the article. The article seems to lack opinions from different sides, particularly those from Google, Facebook, etc. These issues may affect how the story comes across in terms of a news source. Reading the article, I felt that I was reading an opinion piece, not a news story.

  2. Last semester I took a class in Social Media Studies, so I already knew about the ways that big data is changing our privacy. When I learned about it last year it definitely stunned me to know that every link we click on will essentially always follow us back. I think that people don’t actively protest against the privacy issues on the internet mostly because one they are uninformed but also because they just don’t care. I can only come to this conclusion from my own personal experience, but I don’t mind seeing advertisements about clothes that I find cute on my Facebook feed. That is to say I haven’t done anything completely illegal on the internet so I don’t really care that Google monitors the sites that I go to. I definitely think that privacy will become more of an issue as a greater proportion of the population will be using the internet. Again, it doesn’t really worry me that much because I would rather have the internet and infringe on some of my privacy rights rather than not have the internet at all.
    I agree with your point about the length of this article. It was very long to read and at the end I just had to start skimming it because it really lost my interest. However, I do think that the personal accounts as examples were strong because there was definitely a more emotional component to the article.I liked the details and descriptions in the article because it read more like a story and not just like a list of facts. However with that being said, the length was still the biggest problem for me.

  3. Thanks for sharing!

    This is such an incredible topic that needs a lot more attention. I believe that most issues found in society stem from complacency and acceptance. I also believe that these ideas of complacency and acceptance are what makes is so easy for us as young adults the accept the idea that we don’t have privacy because it is so rooted in our technological culture. Essentially, we’ve learned to mold the absence of privacy in our lives as a norm. Personally I would be say what even more chilling about this concept is that I don’t think about it. As described in the article I believe that I have become one of the people who do not question why things are the way that they are.

    In consideration of the article, it was entirely to long. To call this an article would actually be an understatement. I would actually describe this as a collection of short stories. I also felt that even as a college student at a relatively prestigious university some of the working was difficult to understand. If this was intended for a relatively neutral audience the author did not do a good job. I also felt that a lot of the literature that was mentioned in the first paragraph. though interesting, does not help to convey the message because most people are not familiar with that literature. Though the author tries to give a brief synopsis of the literature taking out that idea completely would have really saved the time and concentration of the reader. I felt that his point could have been made a lot more effectively with more statistics rather than personal story after personal story, or perhaps a combination of the two. Additionally, even with the short stories I wish that he could have used subheadings of some sort, because it often felt like I wasn’t sure who’s story was being addressed.

    Overall I think this was a great article to stimulate discussion, and again thanks for sharing.

  4. Why do you think that people do not actively protest in order to gain back their privacy?
    Personally I feel that people do not actively protest to gain their privacy back because they do not feel as if it is being compromised. People do not actively think about their data being collected or shared as they continue to use social media and apps such as instagram and snap chat.
    Do you think that as technology furthers there will be even less privacy and companies will know everything about you with great accuracy? Does that worry you?

    As technology furthers I do believe companies will know more about people with greater accuracy. This would only worry me if it got into the wrong hands.

    How do you feel about the effectiveness of this article in getting the information out there? Do you think that the article is too long? Do you feel as though the various examples of people’s lives adds something to the article? Do you think that the author uses good descriptive language or that a number of the big words just makes the article confusing to understand?

    I feel that this article was affective, but was weighed down by a copious amount of examples. However, overall it was easy to understand and an intersting viewpoint.

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