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Making Money: The Future of News

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/18/business/media-websites-battle-falteringad-revenue-and-traffic.html?_r=0 This article talks about how online news websites are struggling to find ways to make money and adapt to the changing landscape. These websites are also trying to find ways to increase consumer traffic and innovate to meet customers habits. One idea suggested in the article is for news websites to move away from […]

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CRISPR’d Cells: Joining the Fight Against Cancer

https://www.statnews.com/2018/07/11/crispr-makes-cancer-cells-turncoats/ This article provides an update on a new cancer treatment that is currently being tested in lab mice. The article begins with a strong lede, comparing this new bioengineered cell to something out of a spy thriller. This not only pulls readers in, but also connects a complex scientific topic to one that is […]

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Creating a Culture: Changing Research Integrity for the Better

https://news.osu.edu/making-research-integrity-a-priority/ This article summarizes the contents of a conference held at Ohio State University for researchers across many different fields. The conference’s goal was to shed light on the many issues that arise surrounding the ethics of research projects and procedures. Research protocol has not always had the ethical procedures that it does now. Even […]

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Writing the Wrongs of Climate Change Research: The Climatologists’ View

John H Richardson writes, “When the End of Civilization is Your Day Job.” The piece starts with an engaging lead that explains what makes this story different from other articles on climate change—the moral issues faced by climate scientists. The author’s choice to omit climate change jargon in the first sentence allows the reader a […]

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A Behind the Scenes Look at Climate Science Leaves Readers Underwhelmed

John H Richardson attempts to make the world of climate science personal in his article,“When the End of Human Civilization is Your Day Job”, but falls short of sending a coherent message. His lede creates an emotional connection to the subject of the article, intriguing readers to know more, however, its wordiness and disorganization creates […]

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Climatologists: The Broken, the Brash, and the Emotional

John Richardson’s piece on the actuality of climatologists had an array of merits that made me want to read until the end. However, I was lacking a strong, concise lede to kickstart the paper, and within the first paragraph, I was scrambling for a “what” and a “why”. It starts with describing a main figure, […]

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Climatologists: a Gloomy Future

John H. Richardson’s August 2015 story, “When the End of Human Civilization is Your Day Job” in Esquire is an interesting read on the lives of climatologists but leaves something to be desired in terms of writing structure. The article is about the struggles climate change scientists face in finding the purpose of their work […]

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Are climatologists afraid to speak up on climate change?

The article “When the end of human civilization is your day job” by John Richardson was a good read it brought up some interesting conversations that are happening among scientist studying climate change like Jason Box. The lede of the article was intriguing because it introduces Box and an “incident” he is dealing with but […]

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Discussing Climate Change in an Era of Disinformation

John Richardson’s article “When the End of Human Civilization is Your Day Job” fell short of a compelling article for a variety of reasons. The article did have some strengths as Richardson did open the article with an intriguing lede that prepares the reader for the ‘doom and gloom’ of the rest of the article. […]

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Fire and Brimstone from the Mouth of a Climatologist

For this week’s article, we examined John H. Richardson’s “WHEN THE END OF HUMAN CIVILIZATION IS YOUR DAY JOB”. The lede for this article, although seemingly interesting, felt a little weak. The author begins by minimizing the issue, saying it is small, but then trying to make it sound important at the same time. As […]

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