Tag Archives: Emilia & Julie’s choice

EPA & the Trump Administration

In the Washington Times article, Wolfgang calls into question the activities of EPA administrator Scott Pruitt and his collusion with gas companies (Devon Energy) during his tenure as Oklahoma attorney general, coordinating efforts to fight energy regulations imposed by the Obama administration. He then directly compares these efforts to the activities of the EPA under […]

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What do you think – is Google evil?

When it comes to divisive issues, the decision of how to present the different viewpoints (and which ones to present at all) is a great power journalist possess. This week, the question is whether or not Google is an “evil” company, primarily based on the way it uses the information of its consumers. In this […]

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The Survival of News: Engaging the Reader

The New York Times article, on the Newspaper Association of America’s removal of the word “newspaper” from its name, does a good job of engaging the reader despite being on an uncommon and unpopular topic. By starting with a thought experiment that takes the reader to their future self being asked, “’Grandma, what was a newspaper?’”, […]

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YouTube Viewership to Pass TV Audiences

An article by the Wall Street Journal found that the hours spent by users on YouTube is predicted to surpass the hours spent by individuals watching traditional television. This is due to the algorithms that Google has created to encourage its visitors to continue watching additional videos. Overall, I thought that the information contained some great statistics […]

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The EPA’s Office of Civil Rights and Environmental Racism

The Center of Public Integrity recently published “Commentary: the deeper meaning of Flint,” which briefly describes the environmental racism embedded in institutions like the EPA’s Office of Civil Rights that enable public health crises like the Flint Water Crisis. Initially, it was unclear how “newsworthy” this article was. What new information was given and why is this […]

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DEQ not sure better cleanup of Gelman dioxane plume is warranted

This article is mainly a report of town hall meeting in Ann Arbor about dioxane contamination. It is very comprehensive since it shows many concerns from residents, city and county officials and the responses of DEQ officials to these concerns. However, one big problem of this article is that it does not have a nut […]

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Republicans on Campaign Trail Largely Ignore the Climate Deal

In the New York Times article, Thomas Kaplan discusses the opinions of Democratic and Republican leaders in regard to climate change and the fate of the Paris climate agreement in the hands of Obama’s successor. Overall, I thought the article was fair in providing quotes from both parties. The quotes helped show how Democrats and Republicans […]

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Evaluating the University’s sexual misconduct policy

This Michigan Daily article describes how student Emily Campbell’s case of sexual assault did not result in finding her perpetrators guilty of sexual assault because of the lack of verbal dissent.  The author thoroughly reports on the incident, results, and complications which resulted in a lengthy article.  I found the sectioning to be helpful to […]

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The Use of Subtitles In (Legal-Related and Other) Articles

The use of subtitles in a story can serve as a roadmap for the reader and the author. In our readings on sobriety court, only the women’s health Web MD article uses subtitles, but none of the others do. Why is that and when might you think of using them? In others words … How do subtitles […]

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Culture clash: Science vs. Journalism

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/notrocketscience/2011/06/28/am-i-a-science-journalist/ This article addresses the rift between science blogging and science journalism from an interesting perspective. The writer considers himself both a science journalist and a science blogger, an apparent contradiction that is refuted by the fact that science blogging can be useful and respectable when it is done using proper journalistic practices (fact-checking, etc.) […]

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