Tag Archives: Emilia & Julie’s choice

YouTube Views Balloon After Google Retools Play-Next Algorithm

This article overviews the increase in YouTube view-time Google’s 2012 re-tooling of its video recommendation algorithm. Google now uses machine learning to parse user history data and give tailored recommendations that promote watch time over total views. In 2017 when this article was written, 2 billion users watched YouTube every 90 days, combining for more […]

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Automakers Express Conflicting Views on Tailpipe Standards

This Bloomberg article focuses on the discourse on US fuel economy policies by automakers, and their efforts to influence Trump’s decision on these rules to be finalized in March. This article is in a format that is different from the traditional structure of lede-nut graph-kicker that we have discussed in class. Instead, the authors start […]

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Keystone XL Pipeline gets a good breakdown by Washington Post

The Washington Post’s article on the Keystone XL Pipeline is an example of good writing that explains the decision made in November 2017 by the Nebraska Public Service Commission entirely. Before reading this article, I knew that the Keystone was an issue related to the Dakotas and Native Americans but I did not know much […]

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CRISPR’d Cells: Joining the Fight Against Cancer

https://www.statnews.com/2018/07/11/crispr-makes-cancer-cells-turncoats/ This article provides an update on a new cancer treatment that is currently being tested in lab mice. The article begins with a strong lede, comparing this new bioengineered cell to something out of a spy thriller. This not only pulls readers in, but also connects a complex scientific topic to one that is […]

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How do biased news organizations report on political news?

“Fake news” has been one of President Trump’s favorite topics to tweet about since his election into office. This term generally refers to the deliberate spread of misinformation via news or social media, but Trump has generalized the term to include news that comes from a politically-biased source. When talking about political news, the source […]

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Three Sides to Every Story

This week’s module includes an intriguing example of one story viewed from three discrete angles. Ryan Standon’s MLive article uses voices of EPA employees, lawmakers, and community members to highlight this EPA lab’s importance in conducting environmental testing and providing jobs. It shows how this proposed cut would hurt the facility, although there is a […]

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Week 5 – Emilia & Julie’s Choice

Two of this week’s articles discuss Trump’s cuts to science funding. These pieces employ very different journalistic techniques. “All the Ways Trump’s Budget Cuts Science Funding” , written by Sarah Zhang, is concise and packed with statistics. I found the article easy to read because it’s so straightforward, but I think it lacks in quotes. In […]

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EPA & the Trump Administration

In the Washington Times article, Wolfgang calls into question the activities of EPA administrator Scott Pruitt and his collusion with gas companies (Devon Energy) during his tenure as Oklahoma attorney general, coordinating efforts to fight energy regulations imposed by the Obama administration. He then directly compares these efforts to the activities of the EPA under […]

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What do you think – is Google evil?

When it comes to divisive issues, the decision of how to present the different viewpoints (and which ones to present at all) is a great power journalist possess. This week, the question is whether or not Google is an “evil” company, primarily based on the way it uses the information of its consumers. In this […]

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The Survival of News: Engaging the Reader

The New York Times article, on the Newspaper Association of America’s removal of the word “newspaper” from its name, does a good job of engaging the reader despite being on an uncommon and unpopular topic. By starting with a thought experiment that takes the reader to their future self being asked, “’Grandma, what was a newspaper?’”, […]

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