Tag Archives: science

A Failing Grade for the Drinking Water in America’s Schools

A warm morning on the turf is a summertime routine for high-school outside linebacker Zechariah Bailey. On this mid-August day, however, as Bailey reached for his first rejuvenating stretch, his teammates warned him not to drink or even touch the water from the drinking fountains. As he heard that dangerous amounts of lead had just […]

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Eliminating Heavy Jargon in Scientific News with Technology

Project Title: Eliminating Heavy Jargon in Scientific News with Technology Team Members: Sarah Kleppe, Cameron Leitz, Rio Mizuno Requested Amount: $25000 Expected Amount of time to Complete Project: 8 months   Describe your Project: Our idea is to create a website that helps readers understand scientific journals and articles since these documents often include scientific […]

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A Culture of Constant Learning at SEJ Conference

I attended the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) Conference on Friday, October 5th, and was surprised by the inclusiveness of the group. A woman sitting in front of me during the first presentation noticed my nametag labeled with, “Student.” She turned around and smiled. “Welcome,” she said, before raising a hand to ask the presenters […]

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SEJ 2018: Thoughts from Jane Goodall & Meaghan Parker

I attended the luncheon event featuring Jane Goodall on Tuesday. She responded to questions regarding her inspiration to work among chimpanzees, challenges in her five decades of research, lessons learned, and lifestyle and sustainability. I had read before about her research experiences and role as an activist for animal rights and conservation, so I was […]

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Creating a Culture: Changing Research Integrity for the Better

https://news.osu.edu/making-research-integrity-a-priority/ This article summarizes the contents of a conference held at Ohio State University for researchers across many different fields. The conference’s goal was to shed light on the many issues that arise surrounding the ethics of research projects and procedures. Research protocol has not always had the ethical procedures that it does now. Even […]

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Writing the Wrongs of Climate Change Research: The Climatologists’ View

John H Richardson writes, “When the End of Civilization is Your Day Job.” The piece starts with an engaging lead that explains what makes this story different from other articles on climate change—the moral issues faced by climate scientists. The author’s choice to omit climate change jargon in the first sentence allows the reader a […]

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A Behind the Scenes Look at Climate Science Leaves Readers Underwhelmed

John H Richardson attempts to make the world of climate science personal in his article,“When the End of Human Civilization is Your Day Job”, but falls short of sending a coherent message. His lede creates an emotional connection to the subject of the article, intriguing readers to know more, however, its wordiness and disorganization creates […]

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Climatologists: The Broken, the Brash, and the Emotional

John Richardson’s piece on the actuality of climatologists had an array of merits that made me want to read until the end. However, I was lacking a strong, concise lede to kickstart the paper, and within the first paragraph, I was scrambling for a “what” and a “why”. It starts with describing a main figure, […]

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When a Climate Scientist Tweets His Mind

John H. Richardson’s 2015 piece, “When the End of Human Civilization Is Your Day Job” reads through a dense topic quickly, if a little un-clearly. The lede pulled me in with the story of Dr. Jason Box’s tweet. For this reason, I assumed that his work would be the focus of the article. I was surprised […]

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The Human Beings Behind the Science

John H. Richardson’s 2015 piece, “When the End of Human Civilization Is Your Day Job”, discusses the sometimes harsh reality of life as a climate scientist living in a world of powerful deniers. Richardson’s article profiles several individuals, detailing their own personal and professional experiences as climatologists. As soon as I read the title, I […]

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