Worth a Thousand Words: Visual Storytelling and the Future of News

Ever heard the saying, “A picture’s worth a thousand words”? This phrase has taken on a whole new meaning in terms of news stories with the ever-growing trend of visual storytelling. Due to its myriad of forms (encompassing everything from individual snapshots to infographics to video interviews) as an ever-evolving medium, the technological and communicational […]

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Depression and Suicide

The article for this week titled “Depressed, but Not Ashamed” stands out to me as a game changer. One of the things I enjoy most about this generation that I am in is that we are unafraid to break the mold. This isn’t something I’ve always known because I come from a hometown where people […]

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Thoughts on Depression

I am just going to note a few interesting things from the articles that I’ve read about depression: 1. It’s interesting to refer to major depression as ‘unipolar’ because the person doesn’t swing from manic depression to a bewildering state of euphoria, which would be considered bipolar disorder. 2. I never knew that mood disorders, […]

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Visual Storytelling: Depicting Sensitive Material Tastefully

This article from The Verge features two examples of visual storytelling: illustration and video. The topic is highly sensitive and personal, and would not nearly be as impactful if it just relied on text to tell the story. It is a feature about a women who received a face transplant; a highly dangerous and invasive […]

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Catherine Badgley on Our Food Sytem

  I decided this semester to write a profile about a former professor of mine, and a very respected researcher in her field. The profile wound up being about the research that interests her and the food system. It was an amazing experience firstly, because I learnt about some key interviewing skills, but also because I […]

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Have your beliefs about news changed? What is the future of news?

Four months ago, we ask students in our environmental and public health journalism course at the University of Michigan to write ten, one-sentence statements about news that began with the words “I believe.” After practicing reporting and journalistic writing, critiquing news stories, experimenting with various digital forms of communication and working in teams to develop […]

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Politics, Environment, and How to Effectively Report on The Two

This week we were assigned readings that discussed environmental politics, which can often be a topic that is met with opposing opinions and often much confusion from the public. The New York Times recently published an article “Obama Tells Donors of Tough Politics of Environment” written by Michael Shear. President Obama states, “If we’re going […]

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Changing Role of Campaign Contributions in Environmental Policy

As many of you have probably heard, at the beginning of the month the Supreme Court ruled to lower limits on aggregate campaign donations in McCutcheon v. FEC. To give you an idea of what this means you can take a look here. Many environmental activists are concerned that the ruling will mean greater influence of money over […]

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David Clipner, the Nature Cure

Tucked right next to Black Pond Woods, perched atop a small hill on Ann Arbor’s north side, you can find the Leslie Science Center. Large gardens surround century old buildings. Soft grass covers the hillside. Birds chirp. Kids play. It seems as if everything is blissfully humming along to the beat of nature itself. David […]

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One Eye on the Prize, The Other at Home

Dressed in a teal, sterile surgeon uniform, Dr. Thiran Jayasundera holds micro scissors with latex gloves. Sitting, he leans in to stare through a microscope-like lenses aimed straight down over a patient’s eye. Back aches. Bright lights. At any moment in the four-hour surgery, one accidental twitch of his hand could make him brush one […]

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Improving Working Environments One Statistic At A Time

In the early 1970’s, Dr. Janet Malley had just graduated from Boston University with a degree in government, and her first job was brewing coffee. Malley remembers her boss demanding that she make coffee daily after his morning tennis match. “He wanted his coffee when he came to the office, and I wasn’t particularly interested […]

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The Bee Keeper

While honeybee colonies all over the United States hibernate for the winter, former professional golfer and current student Parker Anderson, 32, is leading a meeting of UMBees, the University of Michigan’s student beekeeping club. While the tone of the meeting is light – buzzing from marketing to financing from the sale of scented lip balms […]

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Reviewing the Quality of Medical Journalism: Hype vs Accurate Reporting

In your own writing, you should think about the goals you are trying to accomplish.One way to start doing that, is by evaluating another author’s work, like we have done with our peer edits. This article gives a “score” to an article written on the New York Times. What score would you give the NY […]

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